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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
an answer that we never expected? >> i'm trying to get out of afghanistan to all places. that's where the money's at. >> i want to go, too. >> pelley: you're trying to go to afghanistan? what are you trying to do in afghanistan? >> rebuild. >> rebuild. >> make a living. >> pelley: how many people think there are opportunities in afghanistan? >> oh, i know it. >> pelley: turns out their aerospace skills fit the war, and the war fits their special sense of duty. >> these people maintained, built and operated a human space flight program and produced for the american people, produced the crown jewel for the united states, and that's what we want to do. >> pelley: how many of you expected to retire in the space program? everybody. how many of you have dipped into your retirement savings at this point? so you're spending your future that you were socking away. >> well, i figure the day i wake up dead, i won't go to work. >> the bottom line is there's not going to be anything for me to retire on. >> pelley: difficult as the jobs picture is tonight, there was celebration this morning here at
. the families of british soldiers killed in afghanistan and iraq discovered they were on the list, too. >> if these actions are proved to have been verified, i'm appalled. i'm... i find it quite disgusting. >> reporter: all over the country, military families are now wondering if the "news of the world" had been snooping on them, too. tony phillipson, whose 29-year- old son james died in afghanistan in 2006, is convinced that reporters hacked into his dead son's email account. that was taken in afghanistan? he's now demanding the answer to the question everyone in britain is asking. >> what on earth did they expect to find? it's unbelievable. i can't rationalize it. it doesn't make any sense. >> reporter: all the anguish and the outrage is pushing authorities to act. we've just heard that andy coleson, who's the former editor of "the news of the world" and also, until recently, communications advisor to britain's prime minister, has been told by the police that he's going to be arrested tomorrow. scott? >> pelley: thanks, liz. with the d-day for default less than four weeks away, presi
attacks against u.s. troops in afghanistan. two sources tell us that he was killed last month in pakistan by a u.s. drone. one official said to us today, "we know we got him this time." at the white house today, the president said he will begin sending condolence letters to families of troops who commit suicide in a war zone. troops who die in combat have always received this honor. but for generations, suicide victims have not been acknowledged by the president. the white house has been reviewing this policy, but mr. obama took action one week after elaine quijano first reported this story on our broadcast. elaine? >> reporter: well, scott, the president says he made the change to the condolence letter policy to remove the stigma associated with one of the unseen wounds of war-- suicide. in a written statement, the president said: the group iraq and afghanistan veterans of america, which has been advocating for more mental health programs for veterans, called the president's action long overdue. >> while we think this is a positive first step, i think a lot more needs to be done, that th
would be targeted for supporting the u.s. war in afghanistan. then after a norwegian newspaper reprinted cartoons of the prophet mohammed in 2006, once again al qaeda called for revenge. then last july, three alleged al qaeda operatives were arrested inside norway for plotting to hit targets there. but i have to say, there have been no claims of responsibility. u.s. officials say right now there's no solid evidence this is al qaeda. there's a wide field of suspects, including political radicals. >> schieffer: okay. well, thank you very much, bob. bob orr in washington. well, yes, it is july, and it's supposed to be hot in july. but it's hard to remember it being this hot. today the east coast got a full dose of the heat wave that's blamed for 34 deaths nationwide. in new york and atlantic city, the temperature actually hit 104. baltimore and washington saw 105, and it felt a lot hotter. here's jim axelrod. >> reporter: in the last week, 1,472 temperature records have been set or tied across the country. newark, new jersey, hit 108 degrees-- the highest temperature ever recorded there. >>
't get the help they needed must change." the group iraq and afghanistan veterans of america, which has been advocating for more mental health programs for veterans, called the president's action long overdue. >> while we think this is a positive first step, i think a lot more needs to be done, that the white house really needs to redouble its resolve to addressing this suicide epidemic head on. >> would not try to seek honor, nor was he being a coward. >> reporter: if anyone can be credited with changing the policy it's greg and janet keesling, they have been fighting for the change since 2009. that's the year their son, 25-year-old army specialist chance keesling, killed himself on his second tour in iraq. they say acknowledgement from the president gives them some comfort. >> he was a good soldier. so i think that's the part that i want to know that the country appreciates, that he fought, he did everything he was asked to do. >> reporter: but there are still military families who will not be receiving condolence letters. the policy change does not include suicide or training acciden
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)